Known by various names, they all boil down to being just that, gravy.  There’s giblet gravy to pour over the mashed potatoes and maybe over the stuffing at Thanksgiving dinner.  There’s the rich gravy made after frying salt pork over a cowboy’s campfire.  There is gravy made with milk, and then there is the gravy made from the drippings from roast beef or pork.

Known by various names, they all boil down to being just that, gravy.  There’s giblet gravy to pour over the mashed potatoes and maybe over the stuffing at Thanksgiving dinner.  There’s the rich gravy made after frying salt pork over a cowboy’s campfire.  There is gravy made with milk, and then there is the gravy made from the drippings from roast beef or pork.  During the Great Depression, I began my first term at Eastern New Mexico College in Portales, New Mexico, and lived with friends.  A farmer gave us all the tomatoes that we cared to harvest from a crop he had been unable to sell.  We ate tomatoes, canned tomatoes and made and canned tomato juice.  We sometimes made tomato gravy, which was delicious and filling over homemade biscuits.  Another family I knew had heard of egg gravy.  They wanted to know how to make egg gravy and asked me if I knew how to make it.  I had never heard of egg gravy, but I made some for them by whipping an egg or two into some milk and stirring it into some bacon grease in which I had lightly browned a few tablespoons of flour.  It met with their approval.


Water Gravy was made when the cow went dry or died.  Water gravy was considered a very poor substitute, but it was better than nothing.


Granddad Jarnagin demanded what he called “stack gravy” I am told.  It was an extremely thick gravy.  My friend Victoria loved to make sandwiches from cold gravy.  Granddad’s stack gravy would have been ideal sliced for gravy sandwiches.


The children in one family that I knew demanded chocolate gravy for breakfast over toast or hot biscuits.  Now that was a new twist for the old standby!  Add that to your recipe box along with chicken, beef, pork, tomato, water and egg gravy.


If your British friends think I am advising someone to pour gravy over what some of Americans call cookies, let me explain: a biscuit to me is somewhat like your scones.  At one time, a good wife arose early enough to serve hot biscuits each morning with bacon and eggs, and perhaps with fried potatoes and gravy.


Gravy!  What would life be without it?