Papa’s mother and her two youngest sons lived in some place called Phoenix.  Wonderful things sometimes arrived at the post office in Corona from Grandma such as the two large dolls with composition heads and sleepy eyes.  Even before the package was opened, we could hear the dolls saying “mamma” when we turned the box one way and the other.

Papa’s mother and her two youngest sons lived in some place called Phoenix.  Wonderful things sometimes arrived at the post office in Corona from Grandma such as the two large dolls with composition heads and sleepy eyes.  Even before the package was opened, we could hear the dolls saying “mamma” when we turned the box one way and the other.  The most exciting arrivals were those of either Uncle Dewey or Uncle Milt on the few occasions when one of them visited us on the homestead in New Mexico.  I recall one time when we were eating pinon nuts when Uncle Milt was visiting us.  Or maybe I should say that I was eating pinon nuts, for both Papa and Uncle Milt were kept busy shelling those small nuts for me.  The conversation of the adults turned to various kinds of nuts they enjoyed.  Mamma reckoned that Brazil nuts were by far her favorites.  Papa and Uncle Milt favored pecans, which they had found plentiful where they grew up in Texas.  Indicating that I needed more pinon nuts, I piped up with the fact that pinon nuts were my favorite.  The adults considered this hilarious.  To think that those difficult little things could be anyone’s choice was laughable to them.  Well, I am still of the same persuasion.  Pinon nuts are still at the top of the list for me.

On one visit Uncle Milt brought an amazing contraption.  It was a small wooden box, about eight inches high, deep and wide.  It had a few knobs on it and some wires that he attached to a window screen.  There was a loop with earphones made to lift over a head for listening.  Uncle Milt separated these earphones and handed one to each of us little girls.  Imagine my surprise when a voice spoke into my ear, KOA Denver”.  I heard my first radio announcer!

Years later I listened to KGFL Roswell and KOB Albuquerque, on various other radios, but I think that the only station the little box radio could get was KOA Denver.  We were all so happy with it that Uncle Milt left it with us there on the homestead.  When the battery expired, we never replaced it.  I don’t know if the Corona Trading Company store even had batteries for radios, but we kept that little box.  In time we moved it from the homestead to the rock house in Corona where we lived during the school term.  One day Henry Kilpatrick, one of the neighbor boys, asked Mamma if he could have it, and she gave it to him.  I don’t know if he ever got batteries and played it.  Boys seem to need to take clocks and radios apart, and if that is all it amounted to for Henry, I’m sure that was a good end for the little KOA radio.

So many things like that radio would delight a collector of this day, I am sure.  However, they served their purpose in their time, and what more can one ask of any of the amazing inventions that have entertained mankind through the ages?